Security Tip: Connect with Care

It’s easy to see and open Wi-Fi hotspots and connect to them, but BIT urges you to use common sense when you connect. If you’re online through an unsecured or unprotected network, be cautious about the sites you visit and information you release.

  
STOP. THINK. CONNECT., the global cybersecurity awareness campaign, gives us the below tips to assist us all to connect with care by exercising caution and using common sense when connecting –helping all digital citizens stay safer and more secure online.
  
  • Get savvy about Wi-Fi hotspots: Limit the type of business you conduct and adjust the security settings on your device to limit who can access your phone.
  • Protect your $$: When banking and shopping, check to be sure the sites is security enabled. Look for web addresses with “https://” or “shttp://”, which means the site takes extra measures to help secure your information. “Http://” is not secure.
  • When in doubt, don’t respond. Fraudulent texting, calling and voicemails are on the rise. Just like email, requests for personal information or to immediate action are almost always a scam.
  • Be cautious about “scareware:” Cyber criminals have used fear to compromise your computer and to steal your personal information, which may include credit card information and banking login credentials. If you get security notices saying you are infected and need to purchase software, these could very well be attempts to compromise your device.
 

It’s easy to see and open Wi-Fi hotspots and connect to them, but BIT urges you to use common sense when you connect. If you’re online through an unsecured or unprotected network, be cautious about the sites you visit and information you release.

  
STOP. THINK. CONNECT., the global cybersecurity awareness campaign, gives us the below tips to assist us all to connect with care by exercising caution and using common sense when connecting –helping all digital citizens stay safer and more secure online.
  
  • Get savvy about Wi-Fi hotspots: Limit the type of business you conduct and adjust the security settings on your device to limit who can access your phone.
  • Protect your $$: When banking and shopping, check to be sure the sites is security enabled. Look for web addresses with “https://” or “shttp://”, which means the site takes extra measures to help secure your information. “Http://” is not secure.
  • When in doubt, don’t respond. Fraudulent texting, calling and voicemails are on the rise. Just like email, requests for personal information or to immediate action are almost always a scam.
  • Be cautious about “scareware:” Cyber criminals have used fear to compromise your computer and to steal your personal information, which may include credit card information and banking login credentials. If you get security notices saying you are infected and need to purchase software, these could very well be attempts to compromise your device.